Celebrating the heritage of the lands our surname derived from.

Peter Anthony Kincaid
The early history of Kincaids in Scotland


Emerging in the 15th century

The earliest mention of a Kincaid located to date is Robert of Kincade who served on an inquest held at Stirling on 2 October 1425 which found Sir John of Halden, knight, heir to the deceased Sir Bernard of Halden, knight, his father, in the 10 merk lands of Kepdowry and Ardas in the sheriffdom of Stirling and earldom of Lennox. The lands were held in blenche ferme from Marion of Conynghame, lady of Baldovan, and had been in the hands of the baron of Lennox for 24 years since the death of said Sir Bernard of Halden1 As he was serving on such an important inquest, one has to assume that he was of perfect age and thus born before 1401. It is uncertain when he died, so it is difficult to distinguish him from Robert of Kincaide, son and heir of William of Kincaide of Craiglocart. On 2 April 1444, Robert of Kincaide, son and heir of William of Kincaide of Craiglocart, was granted a lease of the lands of Inchbrek and the mill of Antermony from Patrick Lyon, Lord Glamis2. The lands of Craiglockhart and Inchbrek were later that century among the holdings of Robert Kincaid of that Ilk, so it is clear that this is the Laird of Kincaid line. No further record of William of Kincaide of Craiglockart has been found suggesting that he had recently died.

In the 2 April 1444 lease, Robert of Kincaide was noted as being squire to the powerful Patrick Lyon, Lord Glamis. Lord Glamis was a Lord Auditor of the treasury (1450-1451), master of the household to James II (1450-52), ambassador to England (1451 and 1455), keeper of the castles of Kildrummy, Kindrocht, and Balveny (1456-59), and a Lord of Session (1457). As squire to Lord Glamis, Robert and his family would have become familiar to the King and his court. Robert was likely the Robert Kincade of that Ilk who witnessed a charter of various lands by Janet of Fentoun to William Haket at Calendar on 29 June 1448;3 and the Robert of Kyncade of that Ilk who witnessed the foundation charter of various lands by Sir Robert Fleming of Biggar to the chapel of St. Ninians in Kirkintilloch on 23 July 1451.4

It is possible, but less likely, that he was the Robert of Kyncade who witnessed a charter of the lands of Soulislande by Alexander Bruce of Stanhouse to Holyrood Abbey on 23 March 1452/3.5 He was certainly the Robert of Kyncade of that Ilk who acquired the lands of Inchbelly, in the lordship of Altermony, Stirlingshire from Robert, lord Fleming, by charter dated 20 June 1460.6 He was also the Robert of Kyncade of Craiglokkard who witnessed an instrument of sasine in favour of James Stewart of Albany - grandson of Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany - of the east part of Baldorane on 17 January 1464/5.7 Other witnesses to this instrument included Patrick, David and Robert, sons of Robert of Kyncade of Craiglockhard; as well as Donald of Kyncade and his son Robert. The last located record of him is on 27 October 1473 when, as Robert of Kincaid of Craglokhart, he witnessed the renunciation of Elizabeth Menteith, one of the heirs of the late Duncan, Earl of Lennox and spouse of John Napier, of her rights to the lands belonging to William Edmonstoun of Duntrethe in the earldom of Lennox.8

There were other male Kincaids noted in records contemporary to Robert of Kyncade of Craiglocart; namely John, Arthur, Patrick, George, Malcolm, Donald, and David. They were likely close relatives as they were each styled "of" Kyncade. John was the most notable Kincaid of his time and worthy of particular examination.

The first mention of John was the John of Kyncade who witnessed, with Robert of Kyncade of that Ilk, the foundation charter of various lands by Sir Robert Fleming of Biggar to the chapel of St. Ninians in Kirkintilloch dated at Kirkintilloch on 23 July 1451.4 Next we have John of Kyncade whose wife, Jonete of Kyncade, received payments for nursing the Earl of March in 1456 and 1457.9 This Earl of March was Alexander Stewart; the 2nd son of King James II. Then, on 4 July 1460, Johne Kyncade of Balchayriagis (i.e. Balquharrage) witnessed an instrument of sasine in favour of Robert of Kyncade of that Ilk of the lands of Inchbelly, in the lordship of Altermony, Stirlingshire.10

From then on in the 1400s the name John of Kyncade mostly appears in the Linlithgow area. In 1461, John of Kyncade, as keeper of Linlithgow Palace, occupied the mill of Manuel and received payments for the repairs made to Linlithgow Castle.11 Historic Scotland's official souvenir guide for Linlithgow Palace notes that John of Kincade was a sheriff of Linlithgow from 1461 to 1470. John of Kincade was receiver of Crown fermes near Linlithgowshire from 22 June 1464 to 3 July 1466.12 He was almost certainly the John of Kincade who, on 18 February 1468, was granted the lands of Boneside, a third part of the lands of Hiltcleff (which later became known as Hiltly), an acre by the Hospital of St. Marie Magdalene called le Hedriggis, and an acre by Blackness Castle. These lands were around Linlithgow and were formerly held by Thomas of Walterstoune.13 John alienated his lands of Boneside, as on 2 April 1489, George and Margarete Parklee were granted the lands of Buneside resigned by John Kincaid and Thomas Kincaid. John Kincaid had a life tenancy while Thomas (who other records show was the eldest son of John of Kincade of Hiltly) had the fee.14 George Parkle was then a sheriff of Linlithgow. John Kincaid occupied the the lands of Kincavil, near Linlithgow, with his son Thomas in 1486.15 Complete with a mansion16 these lands remained in the family until the marriage of William Hamilton to Thomas of Kincaid's widow, Margaret Stirling17 and by the granting of the ward of John Kincaid, son and heir of the said Thomas, therein called Thomas Kincaid of Hiltre, to Sir Patrick Hamilton on 30 December 1498.18.

On 21 May 1471, John Kincade of Altermony and Arthur of Kincade witnessed an instrument of sasine for infefting Gawin Levyngstone as heir of the late Patrick Levyngstoune of that Ilk, his uncle, in the lands of the barony of Levyngstoune.19 This was likely the above noted John as John of Kyncade of Hiltlee, a couple of years later, held the lands of Polbeth of Gavin Livington of that Ilk, and Arthur de Kincade only appears in this record and in documents relating to Kincavil and the Linlithgow area.19 Next, Johne of Kincade, sheriff depute of Linlithgow, was found guilty before the Lords of Council on 17 June 1480 for giving special counsel to Robert of Linlithgow.20 On 2 April 1478, John de Kincade, sheriff depute of Linlithqw, presided over a special retour (before John Kincade, younger, and others) in favour of Margaret Prestone, as heir to deceased Thomas Preston, her father, in third part of lands of Westerbenyn.21 This Johne of Kincade still held the post of sheriff depute of Linlithgow on 12 July 148022 and he was called before the Lords of Council again on 27 January 1484/5.23 He was also possibly the John of Kyncaid who was cited on 4 December 1488 as bailie for Sir John Ross, Lord of Halkhead, superior of the lands of Walterston, in an instrument of sasine involving 3 oxgangs of lands of Walterston.24

Returning to the other Kincaids contemporary with Robert of Kyncade of Craiglocart, we first find Patrick of Kynkad and George of Kynkad scutiferis as witnesses to a charter by Archibald, abbot of Holyrood, of an acre in St. Leonard's gait dated 12 August 1457.25 This Patrick of Kynkad may have actually been the son (and an eventual successor) of Robert of Kyncade of Craiglocart as cited in the instrument of sasine in favour of James Stewart of Albany dated 17 January 1464/5.7 However, the possibility remains that this is another Patrick. There was a George Kincaid who was bailie of Robert, Abbot of Holyrood, for a number of years prior to the close of the century.26 He would be a good candidate for the George of Kynkad, scutiferis. However, there is no record of him styled 'of' Kincaid. A better candidate for the 1457 George would be the George Kyncade of Pentyintoskan who, on 10 January 1459/60, along with Malcolm of Kyncade and William of Kyncade of Auchinmady, served on the jury which retoured Robert Callendar son and heir of Robert Callendar of Dowrot in the lands of Dowrot in the barony of Calendar.27. The deceased George of Kincaid of Pettintoskale was mentioned in the Acts of the Lords of Council on 23 June 1480.28 Malcolm was certainly the last mentioned Malcolm of Kyncade and the Malcolm of Kincade who on 15 November 1467, served on the jury which found James of Levingston, son and heir of James, Lord Levingston, in the barony of Calentare.29 Lord Livingston was Chamberlain of Scotland so clearly Malcolm's status was significant. Finally, the other Kincaids who were contemporary with Robert of Kyncade of Craiglocart, were Donald and David. Donald, only appears on record as a witness, as Donald of Kyncade, to the instrument of sasine in favour of James Stewart of Albany of the east part of Baldorane on 17 January 1464/5.7. David would be the David of Kyncade, baillie of Edinburgh, who witnessed a charter and sasine of a tenement in Edinburgh to the Abbey of Newbattle from John Kahew alias Haknay and his wife, Elizabeth Tode, on 14 March 1467/8.30 He is also the David Kincade, councillar of Edinburgh, who, on 3 July 1478, witnessed a charter of annual rents from tenements in Edinburgh by Andrew Mowbray, burgess of Edinburgh, to the Church of St. Giles, Edinburgh.31

As previously stated, Robert of Kyncade of Craiglocart was succeeded by his son William. On 28 May 1474, a precept of clare constat was issued by Robert lord Fleming to William of Kyncade, son of the late Robert of Kincade of that Ilk for the lands of Inchbrek.32 The day earlier a testimonial was given at Kyncaide by William Douglas of Walkingfield stating that he had given sasine of the lands of Inchbelly to William of Kyncaide of that Ilk on a precept by Lord Robert Fleming.33 He was likely the William of Kyncade of Auchinmady who, on 10 January 1459/60, served on the jury for the retour of Robert Callendar of Dowrot 27 On 27 August 1480, William Kincaid of that Ilk gave William Champnay letters of reversion for the lands of Ballincloich, Baldow and Champnay.34 On 1 October 1482, William Kyncaid of that Ilk, was a member of the jury which retoured William Livingston as heir of the late Edward Livingston in half the lordship of Kellinsyth (i.e. Kilsyth).35 On 6 June 1486, William Kyncade of that Ilk was noted as a bailie in the earldom of Lennox in an instrument of sasine in favour of John Striveling, son and apparent heir of John Striveling of Craigbarnet.36 On 8 July 1493, William Kincad of that Ilk witnessed a charter to John Lindsay of Cowintoune of the lands of "Erlis-Orcheart."37 William Kincaid of Kincaid left no legitimate heirs but his sons John and Peter were later legitimized by a royal precept dated 30 January 1515/16.38 However, a record in the Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases, dated 23 June 1498, shows that he was previously succeeded by his brother Patrick of Kincaid.39 This record was relating to a dispute with Lord Fleming and additional records relating to the case also cites his brother David Kincaid.40

Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk appears to have been the second son of the Robert of Kyncade who was squire to Lord Glamis. A charter of confirmation, dated only 19 April, was given by Robert lord Fleming of a disposition granted by Robert of Kyncaide of that Ilk to his son Patrick of Kyncaide, of the lands of Inchbelly and Inchbrek.41 He may have been the above noted Patrick of Kynkad who also witnessed the charter by Archibald, abbot of Holyrood, of an acre in St. Leonard's gait, on 12 August 1457.25 He was possibly the Patrick Kincaide who, with his brother David, succeeded Thomas Willison to four bovates of land in the Grange of Bothkennar in 1486.42 Two years later the lands were occupied by John Shaw of Knockhill.43 In 1492, he succeeded to the lands of Craiglockhart.44 Patrik of Kincaid of that Ilk was then was involved in a dispute with Gawane Hamilton and others over the lands of "Ryding in the Monkland" which ended up before the Lords of Council on 27 June 1496.45 An instrument recording that Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk presented John lord Fleming of Altermony with a royal brieves for infefting him in the lands of Inchbelly was made on 30 March 1498.46 This immediately set off a dispute with Lord Fleming over debts and the lands of Inchbreak and Inchbelly which also went before the Lords of Council on 23 June 1498.39 However, the families settled their differences and on 26 May 1500, a grant was made by John lord Fleming of Altermony, to Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk of the lands of Inchbelly.47

Height of influence in 16th century

Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk was favoured by King James IV for the King interceded on his behalf to continue a tack of the lands of Balmore. In his letter to William, Lord Graham on May 8, circa 1500, the King referred to him as "oure lovite familiar squier and servitour." The extract of the letter reads as follows:

Rex.--Weilbelovite cousing, we grete yhou wele. And forsamekle as ye have set the quarter of your landis of Balmore, the quhilk was umquhile William Grayis, to oure lovite familiar squier and servitour, Patric of Kincaid, for the termes of thre yeris and has tane his grasum tharefore, and as we are informit ye tend and purposis to mak ane new assedacoiun now of the said tak and to put oure said servitor and squier thairfra, we exhort and prais you herfore richt effectuislie and also chargis that ye wil for this oure speciale request kepe the said Patric his takis for the termes forsaid and to suffir nane otheris to intromet with the sammyn, sen he will be als thankful as any utheris, as ze wil report speciale thank of tharfore, and have the materis concerning you in time to cum sped at our hand; and God kepe yow. Writtin under oure speciale signet of the Unicorne, at Edinburgh, the viij day of May; and quhat ye wil do hereto that ye certify us your mind agane in writt with the berar.48
Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk married Edigie Houstoun49 and was survived by a daughter, Elizabeth,50 who married Thomas Kincaid of Craiglokkart51, son of the Thomas Kincaid of Coates who was Constable of Edinburgh Castle.52 On 3 July 1505, Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk resigned his lands of Craiglockart to his son-in-law49 and he was dead by 25 June 1507.51

The Coates line appears to have originated with Thomas Kincaid, Elizabeth Kincaid of that Ilk's father-in-law, who was in the lands of Cotis on 1 October 1512.53 At that time he was married to Elizabeth Boncle.53 It can be proven from a series of records that he was the son of David Kincaid, burgess of Edinburgh. On 5 October 1504, Thomas Kincaid, son and heir of the late David Kincaid, burgess, was entered to 3 li. annualrent from the tenement of the late Archibald Nudry, now of George Halkerston, on the south side of High Street, between the land of the late Walter Bertram on the east and the land of the late John Tavernare, now of the said George, on the west.54 This was certainly the 3 li. payable from the lands of the late Robert Nudry and John Tainner to David Kincade and his heirs as recorded in the charter granted to James Beltmakare on 12 September 1477.55 It is difficult to distinguish this David from potentially other David Kincaids but it is possible that he was the above noted David Kincade, bailie of Edinburgh in 1467/830 and councillor of Edinburgh in 1478.56 Regardless, the 3 li. annualrent, this time referred to as from the land of the late George Halkerston on the south side of the High Street, between the land of the late Walter Bartraham on the east, the tenement of the said late George, formerly of John Tavernar, on the west, the great mansion of the said George on the south and the street on the north, was inheirited by Master John Kyncaid, as son and heir of Thomas Kyncaid, burgess, on 30 March 1517.57 Master John Kincaid was the son of Thomas Kincaid of Coates.58

Thomas Kincaid of Coates was Constable of Edinburgh Castle from at least 1508 to 1 March 1512/1359 and was Master of Works for King James IV at least in 1511.60 He oversaw preparations made at Edinburgh Castle for the invasion of England in 1513, including the casting of some of the great cannons61 used in the Battle of Flodden, and obtaining metal for the building of The Michael,62 the largest and most powerful ship of its day.

Thomas Kincaid of Coates, the Constable, had at least three sons: John, a chaplain and notary,63 Thomas63, married to the heir of Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk,51 and David Kincaid63 who married Helen Moubray.63 Thomas, the Constable, may have died in the Battle of Flodden for he was referred to as the late Thomas Kincaid in 1517.64 However, his family continued to prosper. His son Thomas Kincaid of that Ilk, was a Deputy-Constable in Parliament on 11 December 153465 - suggesting that he was a baron - and a special sheriff of Dumbarton on 25 September 1549.66 David Kincaid in Coates and James Kincaid in Coates, are on record as special Sheriffs of Ayr on 18 May 1525.67 On 23 March 1532/3, David Kincaid of Coates, his son, David and his kinsman Patrick Kincaid were warded as state prisoners in Edinburgh Castle for assualting in the streets John Pitcairn, a vassal of Sir John Towers of Inverleith.68 It also seems that the office of Constable of Edinburgh Castle remained in the family for David Kincaid of Coates was Constable as early as 1541.69 He was removed from office during the civil strife of the period inducing his kinsman, Patrick Kincaid, to offer to betray Edinburgh Castle to the Lord Grey of Wilton in revenge after the battle of Pinkie.70

Other Kincaid's continued to prosper as well following the Battle of Flodden. Connected to the Coates family was Edward Kincaid who appears in 1516 as a Bailie of Edinburgh.71 He was Sheriff-Depute of Edinburgh in 1521,72 at the time of the famous "Cleansing of the Causeway," and likely the same Edward Kincaid who was a Sheriff of Peebles shortly thereafter.73 Furthermore, no less than seven Kincaids accompanied King James V to France on 1 September 1536 for the King's marriage to King Francis I's daughter Madeleine.74 Thomas Kincaid, Edward Kincaid, David Kincaid, James Kincaid, Robert Kincaid, Thomas Kincaid, and John Kincaid were all listed as being in Lord Fleming's entourage for this great occasion.74 Patrick Kincaid of Leith, was Master Brewer to King James V in the 1530s 75 and 1540s 76 and Jyre Kincaid was keeper of the King's hounds in 1539.77

A number of the Kincaids adhered to the royal family and got caught up in the intrigues surrounding Queen Mary. John Kincaid of Warriston was a relative and intended protégé of Bishop Bothwell and was with him briefly in Orkney in 1561.78 Alexander Kincaid, originally a servant to Adam Bothwell, was one of the Queen's half-brother's, Robert Stewart's, closest servants and was put to the horn for the slaughter of Adam Dickson in 1576.79 William Kincaid was one of the Queen's most trusted couriers and was sent to France with her letters and directions of the Queen's party.80

Loyalty to Queen Mary was to bring misfortune to some of the family upon her downfall. Caught up in the civil war that followed the Queen's defeat at Carberry Hill, James Kincaid of that Ilk was temporarily imprisoned in Doune Castle81 for an attack on the Lennox of Woodheid in 1571, while his brother Robert and sons James, George and Malcolm were denounced rebels and put to the horn.82 James Kincaid, younger, must have won a pardon as he and his wife Christine Leslie, a daughter of the 4th Earl of Rothes,83 were confirmed in the lands of Craiglockart a couple of years later.84 Edward Kincaid, maltman, descended from the House of Coates,85 supported William Kirkcaldy of Grange's forces in the defense of Edinburgh Castle against the forces of Regent Morton in 1573 and was to pay a hefty composition of 400 because of it.86

More troubled times lay ahead for the Kincaids as feuds and murder were to trouble the family for a number of years. Malcolm Kincaid, son of James Kincaid of that Ilk, was killed in an attack by their Stirling neighbours in June 1581.87 Jean Ramsay, Lady Warriston and wife of John Kincaid, was forcibly abducted by Robert Cairncross (known as Meikle Hob) and three other men in March 1591. They were captured and tried for their crime.88 John Kincaid of Warriston was murdered by his wife's lover, Robert Weir, on 1 July 1600.89 Convicted for instigating the murder, his wife, Lady Jean Livingstoun of Dunipace, was quickly beheaded on the "Maiden." However, the the infamy of the murder was to live on in a Scottish ballad.90 Later that year, John Kincaid of Craig House led an armed party to the house of John Johnston in the Village of the Water of Leith and forcibly abducted the widow Isabel Hutcheon. Abducting a wealthy widow or heiress (at times with her consent) for the purpose of marriage was not uncommon in Scotland in those days. The King was riding nearby and upon hearing of the incident sent a force to recover the widow. John Kincaid was later fined 2,500 merks and lost his fine brown horse to the King.91 In December 1605, a feud erupted between the Kincaids of Warriston and the Logans of Bonnington culminating in an armed clash in the streets of Edinburgh.92 In 1615, when a judgment for debt was being issued against James Kincaid of that Ilk, a force of between 120-140 supporters, under the command of his uncle Captain George Kincaid, came to his defense and repulsed the King's messenger.93 The next year a feud broke out between Sir James Kincaid of that Ilk and Sir George Elphinston of Blythswood, later Justice-Clerk of Scotland, resulting in Sir James Kincaid of that Ilk being put to the horn and denounced a rebel.94 Four years later, his brothers Andrew and John, in his absence, renewed their feud with the Stirlings and were denounced rebels.95 Two years later the dispute was settled and Andrew and John appear to have avoided further prosecution.96

Trials of the 17th century

Finally, the civil war would forever change the Kincaids' fortunes in Scotland. Thomas Kincaid was appointed a surgeon in Alexander Leslie's Covenanter army invading England to support the Parliamentarians and he was given command of a brigade of two regiments prior to the Battle of Marston Moor in 1644.97 Thomas Kincaid of Warriston suffered heavily during the civil war as subsequent invading English armies, particularly by invasions in 1650 and 1651, inflicted damages to his estates of Warriston, Heuch and Overgoger amounting to 37,000 merks Scots.98 It was at this time that some Kincaids migrated to Ireland. Captain Alexander Kinked, Captain Robert Kinkead, Claud Kinkead and Alexander Kinkead were among the '49 officers who received grants in Ireland upon King Charles' return to power.99

The end of the civil war would usher in a new era for the Kincaids as it marks the beginning of the Kincaid diaspora to other lands. This will have to be dealt with in another article.


Sources:

  1. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. Haldane of Gleneagles Papers, GD198/9.
  2. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/1.
  3. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 138, no. 618.
  4. Registrum Episcopatus Glasguensis: Munimenta Ecclesie Metropolitane Glasguensis A Sede Restaurata Seculo Ineunte XII Ad Reformatam Religionem. Ed. Cosmo Innes. Vol II. Edinburgh: Bannatyne Club, 1843. 75: p. 390, no. 365.
    It is possible that there were three contemporary Roberts. The Robert of Kincaide, who was heir to William of Kincaide of Craiglocart, certainly became the Laird of Kincaid as his son, William, was noted as son and heir of Robert of Kincade of that Ilk when he was entered into the lands of Inchbrek on May 28, 1474 (reference given later). However, since William of Kincaide of Craiglocart was not styled "de eodem" or "younger," one may propose that he was not the Laird of Kincaid but that he died before succeeding his father or that he was a younger brother of the last Laird of Kincaid. Thus, the Robert Kincade of that Ilk who was a witness in 29 June 1448 and the Robert of Kyncade of that ilk who was a witness in 23 July 1451 (references given later) may have been the grandfather or uncle of Robert of Kincaide, son and heir of William of Kincaide of Craiglocart, who later became the Laird of Kincaid. If so, this Robert was deceased by 20 June 1460 when William of Kincaide of Craiglocart's son Robert got a grant of the lands of Inchbelly and was therein referred to as Robert of Kyncade of that Ilk (reference given later). One could also propose that the Robert of Kyncade who witnessed the March 23, 1452/3 charter of Soulislande was a third Robert because he was not styled "de eodem" or "de Craiglocart." By 1464, there were certainly three known Robert of Kyncades; the Laird of Kincaid, his son Robert, and Robert, son of Donald of Kyncade (references given later). It is this author's belief that there was only one Robert of Kyncade of that ilk between 1444 and 1474 and that he was the son of William of Kyncade of Craiglockhart.
  5. Liber Cartarum Sancte Crucis; Munimenta Ecclesie Sanct Crucis de Edwinesburgh. Edinburgh, 1840. p. 145-146, no. 125.
  6. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/2.
    One could also propose that this was again the grandfather or uncle of Robert of Kincaide of Craiglocart but evidence suggests otherwise. The day before William, son of Robert of Kincaide of that Ilk, succeeded his father in the lands of Inchbrek he succeeded to the lands of Inchbelly. This suggests that the Laird of Kincaid had recently died and his son was being entered into his lands as heir.
  7. Fraser, William. The Stirlings of Keir: And Their Family Papers. Edinburgh, 1858. p. 233-235, no. 38.
  8. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. GD97: Papers of the Edmonstone family of Duntreath, Edmonstone, no. 15.
  9. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1883. VI. (A.D. 1455-1460): 232-234, 286 & 321-322.
  10. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/2.
  11. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1884. VII. (A.D. 1460-1469). p. 47-49.
  12. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1884. VII. (A.D. 1460-1469). p. 319-321 & 402-405.
  13. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 203, no. 983.
    The charter was dated 1460 but had a regnal year indicative of 1468. The editors chose to date it 1468 to conform to the regnal year.
    Macdonald, Angus. The place-names of West Lothian. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1941. p. 59.
  14. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 388, no. 1834.
    Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Ed. M. Livingstone. Edinburgh: H. M. General Register House, 1908. Vol. 1 (A.D. 1488-1529): p. 39, no. 309.
    Acta Dominorum Concilii: Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases Vol. II. A.D. 1496-1501. Ed. George Neilson and Henry Paton. Edinburgh: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1918. p. 304, 407, 449, & 466.
    Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496): p. 718-719.
    Acta Dominorum Concilii 26 March 1501 - 27 January 1502-3. Ed. James Avon Clyde. Edinburgh: Printed for the Stair Society by J. Skinner & Co., Ltd., 1943. 449. The Stair Society. 8: p. 172-173.
    John Kincaid was the heir to his grandfather John of Kincaid of Hiltlie, and to his father, Thomas Kincaid of Qwylt, in the lands of Polbeth, Qwylt (ie. Cults), Cowhill, and 10 of annualrents in Edinburgh. His mother, Margaret Stirling, had remarried to William of Hammyltone, whose family then got their holdings in Kincavil. These records together show that the lands of Hiltly, Boneside, Polbeth, and Kincavil all vested in the same person John of Kincade.
  15. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1886. IX. (A.D. 1480-1487, ADDENDA 1437-1487.). p. 640-641.
  16. Fraser, William. "Report on the Muniments and other Family Papers belonging to The Right Honourable William Buller-Fullerton Elphinstone, Lord Elphinstone, at Carberry Tower, near Musselburgh, in the County of Edinburgh." Ninth Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts: Part I. - Report and Appendix. London: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1883. p. 188, no. 27.
    This record alleges that John Kincaid and the Lord of Manerstone used coercion to attempt to gain the lands of Plean in Stirlingshire. The abstract reads as follows: "Instrument in which Patrick Jonstone, a notary public, declares in presence of Mr. William Foullar, Canon of Dunblane and Commissary of Lothian, that he was taken by force [manu forti] on the part of James Levingston, Lord of Manerstone, and was carried off to Kyncavil, the mansion of John Kincaid, and there was compelled to fabricate an instrument of resignation of the lands of Plane, in the shire of Stirling, at which resignation he now swore on the gospels that he was never present, asserting that the document was false and null, as he fabricated the same under terror of his life; he therefore revoked the same and asserted that it should cause no damage to any innocent lord of Plane in the future, as in itself bearing no testimony of truth."
  17. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496). p. 753-754.
  18. Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Ed. M. Livingstone. Edinburgh: H. M. General Register House, 1908. Vol. 1 (A.D. 1488-1529). p. 39, no. 309.
  19. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. GD86/27: Sir William Fraser Charters
    Acta Dominorum Concilii: Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases Vol. II. A.D. 1496-1501. Ed. George Neilson and Henry Paton. Edinburgh: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1918. p. 466.
    Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 433, no. 2051 (this relates to a chaplainry in the Linlithgow St. Michael the Archangel Parish Church).
    Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496): p. 718-719 (entry for his renting 2 bovates of Kincavil in 1492).
    Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496): p. 753-754 (entry for his renting 2 bovates of Kincavil in 1495 and an acre on the west side of Linlitgow lying on the south side of Spittale).
  20. Acta Dominorum Concilii: The Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Causes A.D. 1478-1495. London, 1839. p. 54.
    Macfarlane, Leslie J. William Elphinstone and the Kingdom of Scotland, 1413-1514, The Struggle for Order. Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1985. p. 110.
  21. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. Inventory of Henderson collection, GD76/112.
  22. Acta Dominorum Concilii: The Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Causes A.D. 1478-1495. London, 1839. p. 77-78.
    He appears to be called Johne of kincade craufurd in this entry.
  23. Acta Dominorum Concilii: The Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Causes A.D. 1478-1495. London, 1839. p. 101.
  24. Calendar of the Laing Charters A.D. 854-1837. Ed. Rev. John Anderson. Edinburgh: James Thin, 1899. p. 51-52, nos. 201 & 202.
  25. Registrum S. Marie de Neubotle: Abbacie cisterciensis Beate Virginis De Neubotle Chartarium Vetus. Edinburgh: Bannatyne Club, 1849. 89: p. 240-242, no. 284.
  26. "Protocol Book of James Young 1485-1515." Ed. Henry M. Paton and Gordon Donaldson. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1941-52. The Scottish Record Society. 74(December 1940). no. 528.
  27. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. GD97: Papers of the Edmonstone family of Duntreath, Edmonstone, no. 9.
  28. Acta Dominorum Concilii: The Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Causes A.D. 1478-1495. London, 1839. p. 61.
  29. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. GD97: Papers of the Edmonstone family of Duntreath, Livingston, no. 24.
  30. Registrum S. Marie de Neubotle: Abbacie cisterciensis Beate Virginis De Neubotle Chartarium Vetus. Edinburgh: Bannatyne Club, 1849. 89: 265-270, nos. 299 & 300.
  31. Registrum Cartarum Ecclesie Sancti Egidii de Edinburgh: A series of charters and original documents connected with the church of St. Giles Edinburgh, M.CCC.XLIV. -- M.D.LXVII. Edinburgh: 1859. p. 136-137, no. 93.
  32. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/6.
  33. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/5. Included as witnesses were Patrick Kyncaide and David Kyncaid who were presumably his younger brothers Patrick and David.
  34. "Protocol Book of Nicol Thounis 1559-1564." Ed. James Beveridge and James Russell. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1927. Scottish Record Society. 57: p. 22.
  35. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. GD97: Papers of the Edmonstone family of Duntreath, Livingston, no. 34.
  36. National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK. Stirling of Law papers, GD237/24/1.
  37. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 501, no. 2355.
  38. Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Ed. M. Livingstone. Edinburgh: H. M. General Register House, 1908. Vol. 1 (A.D. 1488-1529). p. 414, no. 2693.
  39. Acta Dominorum Concilii: Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases Vol. II. A.D. 1496-1501. Ed. George Neilson and Henry Paton. Edinburgh: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1918. p. 228-229. Patrick is therein styled "Patrik of Kincaid of that Ilk, bruther and aire to umquhile Wilyeam of Kincaid of that Ilk."
  40. Acta Dominorum Concilii: Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases Vol. II. A.D. 1496-1501. Ed. George Neilson and Henry Paton. Edinburgh: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1918. p. 159-160.
  41. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/8. The witnesses included Robert of Kyncaide who was almost certainly his younger brother Robert.
  42. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1886. IX. (A.D. 1480-1487, ADDENDA 1437-1487.). p. 632-633.
  43. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496). p. 649.
  44. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Burnett. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1887. X. (A.D. 1488-1496). Appendix, p. 766.
  45. Acta Dominorum Concilii: Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Cases Vol. II. A.D. 1496-1501. Ed. George Neilson and Henry Paton. Edinburgh: H.M.'s Stationery Office, 1918. p. 20-21.
  46. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/9. The witnesses included John Kincaid who was likely the illegitimate son of Patrick's elder brother and predecessor, the deceased William Kincaid of that Ilk.
  47. Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, UK. Lennox of Woodhead Papers, T-LX 1/12/10.
  48. Historical Manuscripts Commission. Report on Manuscripts in Various Collections, Vol. 5: The Manuscripts of Col. Mordaunt-Hay, of Duns Castle; Sir Archibald Edmonstone, of Duntreath; Sir John James Graham, of Fintry, K.C.M.G., etc. Hereford: Printed for His Majesty's Stationery Office by Anthony Brothers Limited, 1909. Series 55: p. 84-85.
  49. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 608, no. 2861.
  50. "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 58, no. 319.
  51. "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 56, no. 311.
  52. "Protocol Book of James Young 1485-1515." Ed. Henry M. Paton and Gordon Donaldson. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1941-52. The Scottish Record Society. 74 (December 1940): p. 398-399, no. 1811. & "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 170, no. 894 & p. 173, no. 909.
  53. Protocol Book of James Young 1485-1515." Ed. Henry M. Paton and Gordon Donaldson. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1941-52. The Scottish Record Society. 74 (December 1940): p. 418, no. 1921.
  54. "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 18-19, no. 101.
  55. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1424-1513. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1882. p. 265-266, no. 1308.
  56. Registrum Cartarum Ecclesie Sancti Egidii de Edinburgh: A series of charters and original documents connected with the church of St. Giles Edinburgh, M.CCC.XLIV. -- M.D.LXVII. Edinburgh: 1859. p. 136-137, no. 93.
    One would at first think that he was the David who was mentioned as the son of Robert of Kyncade of Craiglokkard in 1464/5. While possible, one must consider that this would have resulted in David's grandson marrying the daughter of his brother, Patrick Kincaid of that Ilk. The children of this marriage could have thus been declared illegitimate because the parents were married within the forbidden degrees of consanquinity.
  57. "Protocol Book of John Foular: Volume II 1514-1518." Ed. Marguerite Wood. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1944-53. Scottish Record Society. 75 (December 1942): p. 10-11, no. 42.
  58. "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 170, no. 894 & p. 173, no. 909. & "Protocol Book of John Foular: Volume II 1514-1518." Ed. Marguerite Wood. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1944-53. Scottish Record Society. 75 (December 1942): p. 10-11, nos. 41, 42.
  59. "Protocol Book of James Young 1485-1515." Ed. Henry M. Paton and Gordon Donaldson. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1941-52. The Scottish Record Society. 74 (December 1940): p. 398-399, no. 1811 & Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1901. Vol. IV (A.D. 1507-1513): p. 445-446.
  60. Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1901. Vol. IV (A.D. 1507-1513): p. 278-279.
  61. Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1901. Vol. IV (A.D. 1507-1513): p. 276-277; 278-279; 399; & 445-446.
  62. Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1901. Vol. IV (A.D. 1507-1513): Appendix IV, p. 531.

    The entry reads "[Item to] Thomas Kincaid to by metall for the casteyne of _ _ _ sicht to the mast of the gret schip."
  63. "Protocol Book of John Foular 1503-1513: Volume 1 (continued)." Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1940-1. The Scottish Record Society. 72 (December 1939): p. 170, no. 894 & p. 173, no. 909.
  64. "Protocol Book of John Foular: Volume II 1514-1518." Ed. Marguerite Wood. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1944-53. Scottish Record Society. 75 (December 1942): p. 10-11, nos. 41, 42.
  65. "Acta Parliamentorum Jacobi V." The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland. Vol. 3 (1567-1592): p. 338.
  66. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Powell McNeill. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1898. XVIII. (A.D. 1543-1556): Appendix, p. 480.
  67. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Eds. George Powell McNeill. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1895. XV. (A.D. 1523-1529): p. 631.
  68. Grant, James. Memorials of the Castle of Edinburgh. Edinburgh: William Blackwood and Sons, 1850. p. 283, 286-287.
  69. Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Ed. David Hay Fleming. Edinburgh: H. M. General Register House, 1921. Vol. 2 (A.D. 1529-1542): p. 616.
  70. Calendar of the State Papers Relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603. Ed. Joseph Bain. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1898. Vol 1 (A.D. 1547-1563): p. 45.
  71. "Protocol Book of John Foular: Volume II 1514-1518." Ed. Marguerite Wood. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1944-53. Scottish Record Society. 75 (December 1942): p. 10-11, nos. 41, 42.
  72. Laing, Henry. Supplemental Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Scottish Seals: royal, baronial, ecclesiastical, and municipal: embracing the period from A.D. 1150 to the eighteenth century: taken from original charters and other deeds preserved in public and private archives. Edinburgh: Edmonston and Douglas, 1866. p. 97, no. 572.
  73. "Calendar of Writs preserved at Yester House 1166-1625." Ed. Charles C. H. Harvey and John MacLeod. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1930. Scottish Record Society. p. 127-129, no. 406.
  74. Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. Ed. David Hay Fleming. Edinburgh: H. M. General Register House, 1921. Vol. 2 (A.D. 1529-1542): p. 326-327, no. 2167. The date of this document is the day prior to the King's departure to France.
  75. Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. Ed. George Powell McNeill. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1897. XVI. (A.D. 1529-1536): p. 468.
  76. Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1908. Vol. VIII (A.D. 1541-1546): p. 441.
  77. Compota Thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum: Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Ed. Sir James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1908. Vol. VII (A.D. 1538-1541): p. 274.
  78. Anderson, Peter D. Robert Stewart: Earl of Orkney, Lord of Shetland 1533-1593. Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd, 1982. p. 37-38.
  79. Anderson, Peter D. Robert Stewart: Earl of Orkney, Lord of Shetland 1533-1593. Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd, 1982. p. 137, 178-179.
  80. Calendar of the State Papers Relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603. Ed. William K. Boyd. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1910. Vol VI (A.D. 1581-1583): p. 175-177 & Calendar of the State Papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603. Ed. Joseph Bain. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1900. Vol II (A.D. 1563-1569): p. 642-644.
  81. Fraser, William. The Red Book of Menteith. 2 vol. Edinburgh: n.p., 1880. 2: p. 407, no. 112.
  82. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. John Hill Burton. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1878. Vol. II (A.D. 1569-1578): p. 82-83.
  83. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland. Stirlingshire : an inventory of the ancient monuments. Edinburgh: H.M. Stationery Office, 1963. I: p. 169.
  84. Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum: The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland A.D. 1546-1580. Ed. John Maitland Thomson. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1886. p. 575.
  85. "Protocol Book of Mr. Gilbert Grote, 1552-1573." Ed. William Angus. Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by J. Skinner & Company, Ltd., 1914. Scottish Record Society. 43: p. 54-55, no. 230.
  86. Lynch, Michael. Edinburgh and the Reformation. Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd, 1981. p. 337.
  87. Cameron, John. The Parish of Campsie. 1892. Glasgow: Strathkelvin District Libraries and Museums, 1985. p. 183.
  88. Grant, James. Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh: Its History, its People, and its Places. London: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., 1883. III: p. 98.
  89. Grant, James. Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh: Its History, its People, and its Places. London: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., 1883. III: p. 98-99.
  90. Nimmo, William. The History of Stirlingshire. 3rd edition. Glasgow: Thomas D. Morison, 1880. Vol. 2: p. 287-288. The ballad was:
    It was at dinner as they sat,
    And when they drank the wine,
    How joyful were laird and lady
    Of bonnie Wariston!

    But as he has spoken a word in jest;
    Her answer was not guid;
    And he has thrown a plate at her,
    That made her mouth gush bluid.
  91. Grant, James. Cassell's Old and New Edinburgh: Its History, its People, and its Places. London: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., 1883. III: p. 42. & Grant, James. Memorials of the Castle of Edinburgh. Edinburgh: William Blackwood and Sons, 1850. p. 283, 286-287.
  92. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. David Mason. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1898. Vol. XIV (ADDENDA A.D. 1545-1625): p. 443-445, nos. 247-249.
  93. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. David Masson. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1891. Vol. X (A.D. 1613-1613): p. 410-411.
  94. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. David Masson. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1891. Vol. X (A.D. 1613-1613): p. 455, 472 & 841.
  95. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. David Masson. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1895. Vol. XII (A.D. 1619-1622): p. 315 & 327.
  96. The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Ed. David Masson. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1895. Vol. XII (A.D. 1619-1622): p. 733.
  97. "Acta Parliamentorum CAROLI I." The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland. Vol. 6 (1643-1651): p. 74.
  98. "Acta Parliamentorum CAROLI II." The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland. Vol. 7 (1661-1669): p. 479-480.
  99. O'Hart, John. The Irish and Anglo-Irish Landed Gentry, when Cromwell came to Ireland; or A supplement to Irish Pedigrees. Dublin: George Healy Steam Printer, 1884. p. 394.


© Peter A. Kincaid 2010. All rights reserved.*

*Content on this page may appear similiar to that on Wikipedia for Clan Kincaid. This is due to this author contributing that material to the Wikipedia site. Prior to that, most of the above material was made available, under copyright, on other web sites maintained by the author. While previously under copyright by the author, the material posted on Wikipedia is now considered public domain. However, rights to new content is maintained.